Sharpεn

2018

Sharpεn

The book of science

Tom Sharp

Tom Sharp linguistics

Sharpεn

The longest sentence ever written in Sharpεn so far

About Sharpεn

Orthography

Phonology

Vowels

Consonants

Names of the letters

Stress

Vocabulary

Rules for forming words

Loan words

Numbers and things

Units of measure

Cardinal directions

Kinship

Animals

Colors

Grammar

Verbs

Adjectives

Articles

Plurals

Possessives

Pronouns

Correlatives

Prepositions

Conjunctions

Word-order

Translation

Translating verbs

The Sharpεnis language is not a milestone in the history of science, but like most the poems in The book of science, it has been inspired by milestones in the history of science. Constructing a language is similar in many respects to making a painting or writing a poem.

Mark Rosenfelder describes over three hundred constructed languages; Glottolog classifies 7,695 natural and constructed languages. Clearly, this is a crowded field, and I do not expect Sharpεn to stand out. There are many far more clever and more useful conlangs to study.

As an English-speaker, constructing a language is one way to increase one’s appreciation for the complexity and expressiveness of English. Just think, for example, how many ways you can say “yes” in English:

  • yes
  • yes sir
  • yea
  • aye
  • absolutely
  • affirmative
  • agreed
  • can do
  • certainly
  • cool
  • good enough
  • I do
  • I suppose so
  • OK
  • roger
  • sure
  • right on
  • you bet
  • totally
  • yeh, and that’s not all, folks

The Sharpεnis lexicon is much more limited.

Like all of my works that are online, I revise and update this language without notice. Issues that I intend to resolve by analysis and translation include:

  1. Whether it is a good idea to disallow using a word for more than one part of speech. The Sharpεnis numbers break this rule because they may serve both as nouns and as adjectives. The hypenated present participle also breaks this rule if we continue to let it serve as both an adjective and a noun (gerund). Otherwise, Sharpεn avoids allowing a word to be used as different parts of speech.

See also in The book of science:

Readings on wikipedia:

Other resources: